Best Boxwood Shrubs to Plant in Your Garden

Boxwoods are an exemplary nursery bush, first planted in America in the mid-1600s. They're similarly at home as accents, fences, topiaries, or in compartments. They're additionally deer-safe, so their prominence has soared as of late.

Shockingly, numerous sorts of boxwoods are defenseless to a serious contagious infection called the boxwood curse. The organism shows up as dark-colored spots on leaves until all foliage evaporates and drops. Warm, sticky conditions help it spread—and plants kick the bucket inside months!

To improve your chances of keeping your scene sound, purchase boxwoods that are more infection safe like the ones included here, and don't plant them excessively near one another so air can circulate. Also, regardless of whether you never focus on those mile-long logical names, it's basic now so you get the particular assortment, size, and structure you need.


Here's which boxwoods—and a couple of carbon copies—to consider for your nursery.

Low-Growing, Boxwoods

Sprinter (Buxus microphylla 'Sprinter')

This Japanese boxwood is a quick producer and opposes boxwood curse, just as winter consumes (that seared look that bushes get in spring after an especially hard winter).
Size: 2 to 4 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5 to 9

Wedding band (Buxus microphylla var. koreana)
This plant has gleaming, variegated foliage with lime edges that become brilliant in pre-fall. It's pleasant low support or compartment plant.
Size: 1 to 3 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5 to 9

Nana (Buxus sinica var. insularis 'Nana')
This low-spreading assortment has a lime green new development that blurs to light green. It has great protection from the boxwood scourge.
Size: 2 feet tall, 3 feet wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 6 to 8


Cold-Hardy Boxwoods
Green Velvet (Buxus half breed 'Green Velvet')
This plant has an adjusted structure if not pruned. It's likewise appropriate for thick, low supports.
Size: 3 to 4 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Green Mountain (Buxus mixture 'Green Mountain')
Brilliant green foliage holds its shading throughout the entire winter. The upstanding, characteristic cone shape makes it pleasant for topiary or emphasizes use.
Size: 5 feet tall, 3 feet wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Green Gem (Buxus crossover 'Green Gem')
This moderate developing sort has emerald green summer foliage that bronzes in winter. It's a decent establishment planting or casual support.
Size: 3 to 4 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Glencoe (Buxus half breed 'Glencoe')
This boxwood holds its green shading great through the coldest months of the year. It has a pleasant oval propensity, however, it is more powerless to boxwood curse than some different assortments.
Size: 3 to 4 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 4 to 9

Upstanding Boxwoods
Fastigiata (Buxus sempervirens 'Fastigiata')
Somewhat blue-green upstanding development makes this a pleasant fence plant. It's to some degree tolerant to boxwood scourge.
Size: 6 feet tall, 2 feet wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 6 to 8

Graham Blandy (Buxus sempervirens 'Graham Blandy')
This boxwood flaunts a thick stretching columnar structure that makes a striking example of planting. Great protection from boxwood scourge.
Size: 6 to 9 feet tall, 2 to 4 feet wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5 to 9

Dee Runk (Buxus sempervirens 'Dee Runk')
This upstanding, quick producer makes a perfect, limited fence or emphasizes with its columnar shape.
Size: 8 feet tall, 2 feet wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 6 to 8

John Baldwin (Buxus microphylla 'John Baldwin')
This boxwood has a decent, fat base and expansive cone shape. New foliage has a blue-ish tint.
Size: 4 feet tall, 3 feet wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 6 to 8

Adjusted or Sphere-Shaped Boxwoods
Winter Gem (Buxus microphylla japonica 'Winter Gem')
This boxwood makes a pleasant support and takes shearing great. It's a quick producer and is tolerant of the boxwood curse.
Size: 4 to 6 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5 to 9

Brilliant Dream (Buxus microphylla 'Brilliant Dream')
With its lime shading, this plant is pretty different from the next profound greens in your scene.
Size: 3 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 6 to 9

Green Beauty (Buxus microphylla japonica 'Green Beauty')
This plant holds its dull green foliage in even the most smoking summers. It rises up to warmth, stickiness, and dry spell superior to numerous sorts.
Size: 4 to 6 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5 to 9

Green Mound (Buxus crossbreed 'Green Mound')
This plant has a characteristic adjusted shape. It's useful for fences, establishment plantings, and compartments.
Size: 3 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5 to 8

Boxwood Lookalikes
Jewel Box Inkberry Holly (Ilex glabra 'Diamond Box')
Here's a holly that looks like a boxwood! It appears to be comparable, however, it isn't helpless to curse. The thick ball-formed plant is pleasant as support or in a compartment.
Size: 2 to 3 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5 to 9

Strongbox Inkberry Holly (Ilex glabra 'Strongbox')
Upstanding branches and a for the most part round shape make this lesser-known local holly a decent planting toward establishments or long strolls. What's more, it won't get a boxwood curse!
Size: 2 to 3 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 5 to 9

Juke Box Pyracomeles (x. Pyracomeles)
This spic and span minimal evergreen has sparkly leaves and fine branches. It functions admirably as a fence or example and takes to shearing fine and dandy.
Size: 1 to 3 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 7 to 9

Little Ollie Montra Dwarf Olive (Olea europaea 'Montra')
This diminutive person evergreen has dark green leaves with shimmering undersides and can be pruned or sheared into a fence. It's warmth tolerant.
Size: 4 to 6 feet tall and wide
USDA Hardiness Zones: 8 to 11